Thursday, August 21, 2014

Squidoo to Merge with Hubpages; AllVoices Makes Changes

I'm to the point where I think, with the exception of a few places like Examiner, revenue share is dead. All the big names are closing, like Helium and Yahoo! Voice/Contributors Network. eHow stopped taking new content ages ago. Places like ePinions shut their doors.  Now, Squidoo has decided to merge with HubPages and AllVoices has changed their payment program along with moving to a new site.
I removed my content from Squidoo many moons ago. I have a handful of articles on HubPages. I'm still sorting through all the content I had to remove from Helium and Yahoo. Now, I'm doing the same with AllVoices. In time I think I will remove the last bit from HubPages as well.

Let me just say, trying to find a new home for 100s of articles is a real pain in the ass. I have had a few people reach out to  me and tell me how much I should try this great new site they found.

No, thank you. While I appreciate that, if I doesn't fit on my websites, Examiner or Bubblews then I am going to just leave it be. I'll continue to earn what I can from those who have a new home but I am in no mood to try the next best thing. Instead, I am going to continue to work on making my other websites my own "next best thing."

No hard feelings.


4 comments:

  1. I stopped after the first round of deaths. I just think the industry has moved into a different direction and its not going to be back.

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  2. I agree 100% that rev-share is an old business model, it's dying and that's why all the big sites are closing. True, new ones are mushrooming, but they're being started by writers from Squidoo, Helium and Yahoo! who are stubbornly clinging to the old model, they've got no financial backing, and they will either fail or stumble along in a small way, supported by sad little groups of writers who are too scared to venture out of their comfort zone.

    The only one I have any hope for is HubPages. It's unique among all rev-sharing sites in having a separate sub-domain for each writer, which means the bad writers are quarantined from the good - as soon as they changed their structure, they started to recover from Panda. The fact that they're confident enough to buy out Squidoo suggests they are doing OK and are in it for the long haul.

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    Replies
    1. The ones that are starting don't seem to pay so well. I have looked into a few of them and folks aren't really happy. It just seems like they are using these sites for a dumping ground for places who are closing. I know these sites made money, I just think they got tired of the never-ending changes and slaps on the wrists from Google.

      I really like HubPages. I have been there a long time and used to have quite a bit of content there. Over the years I have moved some of that content over to my own websites because it makes me more money on them. They have gone through their own changes with Google and always do it in a matter that benefits their writers and not harm them like so many other websites have. HubPages has some pretty significant backers. So, as long as they continue to play by Google rules they should be OK. I think Squidoo, while good for certain types of articles, became too much about affiliate linking and less about good content.

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